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Soul City

By Thomas Healy
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Metropolitan Books
  • Isbn : 1627798617
  • Pages : 448
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 688
  • File Pdf: soul-city.pdf

Book Summary:

A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice The fascinating, forgotten story of the 1970s attempt to build a city dedicated to racial equality in the heart of “Klan Country” In 1969, with America’s cities in turmoil and racial tensions high, civil rights leader Floyd McKissick announced an audacious plan: he would build a new city in rural North Carolina, open to all but intended primarily to benefit Black people. Named Soul City, the community secured funding from the Nixon administration, planning help from Harvard and the University of North Carolina, and endorsements from the New York Times and the Today show. Before long, the brand-new settlement – built on a former slave plantation – had roads, houses, a health care center, and an industrial plant. By the year 2000, projections said, Soul City would have fifty thousand residents. But the utopian vision was not to be. The race-baiting Jesse Helms, newly elected as senator from North Carolina, swore to stop government spending on the project. Meanwhile, the liberal Raleigh News & Observer mistakenly claimed fraud and corruption in the construction effort. Battered from the left and the right, Soul City was shut down after just a decade. Today, it is a ghost town – and its industrial plant, erected to promote Black economic freedom, has been converted into a prison. In a gripping, poignant narrative, acclaimed author Thomas Healy resurrects this forgotten saga of race, capitalism, and the struggle for equality. Was it an impossible dream from the beginning? Or a brilliant idea thwarted by prejudice and ignorance? And how might America be different today if Soul City had been allowed to succeed?

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Related Books

Soul City

By Thomas Healy
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Metropolitan Books
  • Isbn : 1627798617
  • Pages : 448
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 717
  • File Pdf: soul-city.pdf

Book Summary:

A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice The fascinating, forgotten story of the 1970s attempt to build a city dedicated to racial equality in the heart of “Klan Country” In 1969, with America’s cities in turmoil and racial tensions high, civil rights leader Floyd McKissick announced an audacious plan: he would build a new city in rural North Carolina, open to all but intended primarily to benefit Black people. Named Soul City, the community secured funding from the Nixon administration, planning help from Harvard and the University of North Carolina, and endorsements from the New York Times and the Today show. Before long, the brand-new settlement – built on a former slave plantation – had roads, houses, a health care center, and an industrial plant. By the year 2000, projections said, Soul City would have fifty thousand residents. But the utopian vision was not to be. The race-baiting Jesse Helms, newly elected as senator from North Carolina, swore to stop government spending on the project. Meanwhile, the liberal Raleigh News & Observer mistakenly claimed fraud and corruption in the construction effort. Battered from the left and the right, Soul City was shut down after just a decade. Today, it is a ghost town – and its industrial plant, erected to promote Black economic freedom, has been converted into a prison. In a gripping, poignant narrative, acclaimed author Thomas Healy resurrects this forgotten saga of race, capitalism, and the struggle for equality. Was it an impossible dream from the beginning? Or a brilliant idea thwarted by prejudice and ignorance? And how might America be different today if Soul City had been allowed to succeed?

Travel Guide of Inner Mongolia

By Ni Hao
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : DeepLogic
  • Isbn : N.a
  • Pages :
  • Category : Travel
  • Reads : 222
  • File Pdf: travel-guide-of-inner-mongolia.pdf

Book Summary:

This book is the volume of ''Travel Guide of Inner Mongolia'' among a series of travel books (''Travelling in China''). Its content is detailed and vivid.

Blacks and the Quest for Economic Equality

By James W. Button,Barbara A. Rienzo,Sheila L. Croucher
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Penn State Press
  • Isbn : 0271073713
  • Pages : 208
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 860
  • File Pdf: blacks-and-the-quest-for-economic-equality.pdf

Book Summary:

The civil rights movement of the 1960s improved the political and legal status of African Americans, but the quest for equality in employment and economic well-being has lagged behind. Blacks are more than twice as likely as whites to be employed in lower-paying service jobs or to be unemployed, are three times as likely to live in poverty, and have a median household income barely half of that for white households. What accounts for these disparities, and what possibilities are there for overcoming obstacles to black economic progress? This book seeks answers to these questions through a combined quantitative and qualitative study of six municipalities in Florida. Factors impeding the quest for equality include employer discrimination, inadequate education, increasing competition for jobs from white females and Latinos, and a lack of transportation, job training, affordable childcare, and other sources of support, which makes it difficult for blacks to compete effectively. Among factors aiding in the quest is the impact of black political power in enhancing opportunities for African Americans in municipal employment. The authors conclude by proposing a variety of ameliorative measures: strict enforcement of antidiscrimination laws; public policies to provide disadvantaged people with a good education, adequate shelter and food, and decent jobs; and self-help efforts by blacks to counter self-destructive attitudes and activities.

The Black City of Nuerva

By Omri Koresh
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Omri Koresh
  • Isbn : 9655725650
  • Pages : 206
  • Category : Art
  • Reads : 833
  • File Pdf: the-black-city-of-nuerva.pdf

Book Summary:

"The Black City of Nuerva" is a personal journey, written in first person. The main character is written as both male and female (considered as queer writing). The book is full of original artwork, with 60 paintings created as a re-interpretation of what is happening in the various scenes of the story. The book and the original artwork took several years and a lot of hard work to complete. **Synopsis** The day of the attack, I was sitting at the park, reading a book. Slavers rode in on monstrous ships. They took everyone, including me. I was taken to a horrible black city called Nuerva, where the buildings were jagged lines cutting across the sky. A man, the Captain, took me as his plaything and kept me as his own prisoner. After many days, I finally found the courage to escape. Alone and frightened, I ran to the furthest edge of the city, and there I found hope. There was another city in the distance—a bright, colorful one. All I had to do was cross the bridge. I didn’t make it. I was shot at the edge of that bridge which connected the light and the dark cities, moments from freedom. But I wouldn’t die just yet. It wasn’t my time. Notes: This book was simplified into a version so Tablets could play it properly. 16:10 Some of the art was reworked / resized for it and the pages are a dark gray so it will be softer on the eyes and easier to read on screens. double spreads were rotated and I recommend you to view the book with a black background. If you want a Physical book, write me at [email protected], omrikoresh.com thank you for supporting my art! If you loved this book please write me a review, if you hated it please tell me why so i won't make the same mistake twice! O. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0869K9VYG

Race, Ethnicity, and the Politics of City Redistricting

By Joshua G. Behr
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : SUNY Press
  • Isbn : 0791485498
  • Pages : 170
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 509
  • File Pdf: race-ethnicity-and-the-politics-of-city-redistricting.pdf

Book Summary:

Nationwide study of the proposal and adoption of minority-opportunity districts at the local level.

City

By Clifford D. Simak
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Gateway
  • Isbn : 0575105240
  • Pages : 256
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 389
  • File Pdf: city.pdf

Book Summary:

On a far future Earth, mankind's achievements are immense: artificially intelligent robots, genetically uplifted animals, interplanetary travel, genetic modification of the human form itself. But nothing comes without a cost. Humanity is tired, its vigour all but gone. Society is breaking down into smaller communities, dispersing into the countryside and abandoning the great cities of the world. As the human race dwindles and declines, which of its great creations will inherit the Earth? And which will claim the stars?

Black Women against the Land Grab

By Keisha-Khan Y. Perry
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : U of Minnesota Press
  • Isbn : 0816688028
  • Pages : 224
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 857
  • File Pdf: black-women-against-the-land-grab.pdf

Book Summary:

In Brazil and throughout the African diaspora, black women, especially poor black women, are rarely considered leaders of social movements let alone political theorists. But in the northeastern city of Salvador, Brazil, it is these very women who determine how urban policies are established. Focusing on the Gamboa de Baixo neighborhood in Salvador’s city center, Black Women against the Land Grab explores how black women’s views on development have radicalized local communities to demand justice and social change. In Black Women against the Land Grab, Keisha-Khan Y. Perry describes the key role of local women activists in the citywide movement for land and housing rights. She reveals the importance of geographic location for understanding the gendered aspects of urban renewal and the formation of black women–led social movements. How have black women shaped the politics of urban redevelopment, Perry asks, and what does this kind of political intervention tell us about black women’s agency? Her work uncovers the ways in which political labor at the neighborhood level is central to the mass mobilization of black people against institutional racism and for citizenship rights and resources in Brazil. Highlighting the political life of black communities, specifically those in urban contexts often represented as socially pathological and politically bankrupt, Black Women against the Land Grab offers a valuable corrective to how we think about politics and about black women, particularly poor black women, as a political force.

Mainstreaming Black Power

By Tom Adam Davies
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Isbn : 0520965647
  • Pages : 328
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 535
  • File Pdf: mainstreaming-black-power.pdf

Book Summary:

Mainstreaming Black Power upends the narrative that the Black Power movement allowed for a catharsis of black rage but achieved little institutional transformation or black uplift. Retelling the story of the 1960s and 1970s across the United States—and focusing on New York, Atlanta, and Los Angeles—this book reveals how the War on Poverty cultivated black self-determination politics and demonstrates that federal, state, and local policies during this period bolstered economic, social, and educational institutions for black control. Mainstreaming Black Power shows more convincingly than ever before that white power structures did engage with Black Power in specific ways that tended ultimately to reinforce rather than challenge existing racial, class, and gender hierarchies. This book emphasizes that Black Power’s reach and legacies can be understood only in the context of an ideologically diverse black community.

Governing American Cities

By Michael Jones-Correa
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Russell Sage Foundation
  • Isbn : 1610443217
  • Pages : 272
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 762
  • File Pdf: governing-american-cities.pdf

Book Summary:

The new immigrants who have poured into the United States over the past thirty years are rapidly changing the political landscape of American cities. Like their predecessors at the turn of the century, recent immigrants have settled overwhelmingly in a few large urban areas, where they receive their first sustained experience with government in this country, including its role in policing, housing, health care, education, and the job market. Governing American Cities brings together the best research from both established and rising scholars to examine the changing demographics of America's cities, the experience of these new immigrants, and their impact on urban politics. Building on the experiences of such large ports of entry as Los Angeles, New York, Miami, Houston, Chicago, and Washington D.C., Governing American Cities addresses important questions about the incorporation of the newest immigrants into American political life. Are the new arrivals joining existing political coalitions or forming new ones? Where competition exists among new and old ethnic and racial groups, what are its characteristics and how can it be harnessed to meet the needs of each group? How do the answers to these questions vary across cities and regions? In one chapter, Peter Kwong uses New York's Chinatown to demonstrate how divisions within immigrant communities can cripple efforts to mobilize immigrants politically. Sociologist Guillermo Grenier uses the relationship between blacks and Latinos in Cuban-American dominated Miami to examine the nature of competition in a city largely controlled by a single ethnic group. And Matthew McKeever takes the 1997 mayoral race in Houston as an example of the importance of inter-ethnic relations in forging a successful political consensus. Other contributors compare the response of cities with different institutional set-ups; some cities have turned to the private sector to help incorporate the new arrivals, while others rely on traditional political channels. Governing American Cities crosses geographic and disciplinary borders to provide an illuminating review of the complex political negotiations taking place between new immigrants and previous residents as cities adjust to the newest ethnic succession. A solution-oriented book, the authors use concrete case studies to help formulate suggestions and strategies, and to highlight the importance of reframing urban issues away from the zero-sum battles of the past.

L.A. City Limits

By Josh Sides
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ of California Press
  • Isbn : 9780520939868
  • Pages : 302
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 713
  • File Pdf: l-a-city-limits.pdf

Book Summary:

In 1964 an Urban League survey ranked Los Angeles as the most desirable city for African Americans to live in. In 1965 the city burst into flames during one of the worst race riots in the nation's history. How the city came to such a pass—embodying both the best and worst of what urban America offered black migrants from the South—is the story told for the first time in this history of modern black Los Angeles. A clear-eyed and compelling look at black struggles for equality in L.A.'s neighborhoods, schools, and workplaces from the Great Depression to our day, L.A. City Limits critically refocuses the ongoing debate about the origins of America's racial and urban crisis. Challenging previous analysts' near-exclusive focus on northern "rust-belt" cities devastated by de-industrialization, Josh Sides asserts that the cities to which black southerners migrated profoundly affected how they fared. He shows how L.A.'s diverse racial composition, dispersive geography, and dynamic postwar economy often created opportunities—and limits—quite different from those encountered by blacks in the urban North.

The Expanding Boundaries of Black Politics

By Anthony Wohl
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1351483129
  • Pages : 404
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 595
  • File Pdf: the-expanding-boundaries-of-black-politics.pdf

Book Summary:

This volume joins the preceding volumes in this distinguished series in presenting contemporary research by leading political scientists addressing topics of interest to those concerned with African-American affairs. It captures the expanding boundaries of black politics and the persistent interests of the black community at large.The anchoring symposium, ""The Expanding Boundaries of Black Politics,"" presents the scholarship of a cadre of young black political scientists actively engaged in the critical tasks of moving forward the study of black politics. Their concerns include expanding the boundaries of black politics along the lines of epistemology and methodology, especially in regard to core issues and areas within this field. In an introductory essay by Todd Shaw, the work of these scholars is situated within the context of temporal shifts in scholarly emphases. Overlapping issues and concerns across time as well as black political scholarship as defined in the field since its beginning are addressed.The second part of this volume, entitled ""Maximizing the Black Vote; Recognizing the Limits of Electoral Politics,"" concentrates on serious lingering social concerns. These include the policy significance of black mayors affecting the concomitant impact of the black vote, the boundaries being pushed concerning the conjunction of black theology and sexual identity, a gendered analysis of familial policies, and the deepening social and economic plight of young black males including felon disfranchisement.The Expanding Boundaries of Black Politics carries forth the search for an understanding of the relationship between religion, the black church, and black political behavior; cross-racial group coalitions as concerns matters of immigration, growing multiculturalism, and the impact on black politics; maximizing the impact of the black vote focusing on voting rights enforcement, the black vote in presidential elections, and the voice of the Congressional Black Caucus

Black Electoral Politics

By Lucius Jefferson Barker
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Transaction Publishers
  • Isbn : 9781412818742
  • Pages : 275
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 489
  • File Pdf: black-electoral-politics.pdf

Book Summary:

The official publication of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists (NCOBPS), this annual publication includes significant scholarly research reflecting the diverse interests of scholars from various backgrounds who use a variety of models, approaches, and methodologies. The central focus is on politics and policies that advantage or disadvantage groups because of race, ethnicity, sex, or other factors. The research is performed in a variety of contexts and settings. This second volume is dedicated to the twentieth anniversary of the founding of the NCOBPS, and is commemorated in a special introductory section that includes major feature articles, a special symposium, and a book review section. Lucius J. Barker is Edna F. Gellhorn Professor of Public Affairs and Political Science at Washington University, St. Louis, and author of a number of books and articles on American judicial politics and public law and African-American politics.

Faith in Black Power

By Kerry Pimblott
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
  • Isbn : 0813168910
  • Pages : 334
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 460
  • File Pdf: faith-in-black-power.pdf

Book Summary:

In 1969, nineteen-year-old Robert Hunt was found dead in the Cairo, Illinois, police station. The white authorities ruled the death a suicide, but many members of the African American community believed that Hunt had been murdered -- a sentiment that sparked rebellions and protests across the city. Cairo suddenly emerged as an important battleground for black survival in America and became a focus for many civil rights groups, including the NAACP. The United Front, a black power organization founded and led by Reverend Charles Koen, also mobilized -- thanks in large part to the support of local Christian congregations. In this vital reassessment of the impact of religion on the black power movement , Kerry Pimblott presents a nuanced discussion of the ways in which black churches supported and shaped the United Front. She deftly challenges conventional narratives of the de-Christianization of the movement, revealing that Cairoites embraced both old-time religion and revolutionary thought. Not only did the faithful fund the mass direct-action strategies of the United Front, but activists also engaged the literature on black theology, invited theologians to speak at their rallies, and sent potential leaders to train at seminaries. Pimblott also investigates the impact of female leaders on the organization and their influence on young activists, offering new perspectives on the hypermasculine image of black power. Based on extensive primary research, this groundbreaking book contributes to and complicates the history of the black freedom struggle in America. It not only adds a new element to the study of African American religion but also illuminates the relationship between black churches and black politics during this tumultuous era.

The Green City and Social Injustice

By Isabelle Anguelovski,James J. T. Connolly
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1000471675
  • Pages : 358
  • Category : Architecture
  • Reads : 733
  • File Pdf: the-green-city-and-social-injustice.pdf

Book Summary:

The Green City and Social Injustice examines the recent urban environmental trajectory of 21 cities in Europe and North America over a 20-year period. It analyses the circumstances under which greening interventions can create a new set of inequalities for socially vulnerable residents while also failing to eliminate other environmental risks and impacts. Based on fieldwork in ten countries and on the analysis of core planning, policy and activist documents and data, the book offers a critical view of the growing green planning orthodoxy in the Global North. It highlights the entanglements of this tenet with neoliberal municipal policies including budget cuts for community initiatives, long-term green spaces and housing for the most fragile residents; and the focus on large-scale urban redevelopment and high-end real estate investment. It also discusses hopeful experiences from cities where urban greening has long been accompanied by social equity policies or managed by community groups organizing around environmental justice goals and strategies. The book examines how displacement and gentrification in the context of greening are not only physical but also socio-cultural, creating new forms of social erasure and trauma for vulnerable residents. Its breadth and diversity allow students, scholars and researchers to debunk the often-depoliticized branding and selling of green cities and reinsert core equity and justice issues into green city planning—a much-needed perspective. Building from this critical view, the book also shows how cities that prioritize equity in green access, in secure housing and in bold social policies can achieve both environmental and social gains for all.

Politics in Black and White

By Raphael J. Sonenshein
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Isbn : 0691188025
  • Pages :
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 993
  • File Pdf: politics-in-black-and-white.pdf

Book Summary:

This book reaches deep into the past of the city of Los Angeles and carries through to the dramatic events that have recently received global attention--the Rodney King beating and the uprising in South Central L.A. Tracing the evolution of an extraordinary biracial coalition in Los Angeles behind Mayor Tom Bradley, Raphael Sonenshein shows how "crossover" politics and racial violence coexist in urban America. While challenging the prevailing pessimism about biracial coalitions in general, he also compares their relative successes in Los Angeles to their disheartening failures in New York City. What emerges is a probing look at a crucial issue of politics in the United States: can whites and minorities find common ground?

City of Dispossessions

By Kyle T. Mays
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Isbn : 0812298543
  • Pages : 264
  • Category : History
  • Reads : 193
  • File Pdf: city-of-dispossessions.pdf

Book Summary:

In July 2013, Detroit became the largest city in U.S. history to declare bankruptcy. The underlying causes were decades of deindustrialization, white flight, and financial mismanagement. More recently it has been heralded a comeback city as wealthy white residents resettle there. Yet, as Kyle T. Mays argues, we cannot understand the current state of Detroit without also understanding the longer history of Native American and African American dispossession that has defined the city since its founding. How has dispossession impacted the development of modern U.S. cities? And how does comparing the historical experiences of Native Americans and African Americans in an urban context help us comprehend histories of race, sovereignty, and colonialism? Using archives, oral and family histories, and community documents, City of Dispossessions is a cultural, intellectual, and social history that argues that physical and symbolic forms of dispossession of Native Americans and African Americans, and their reactions to dispossession, have been central to Detroit's modern development. The book begins with the first settlement by the Frenchman Cadillac in 1701 and chronicles how the logic of dispossession has continued into the present, through a wide range of forms that include memorialization of the "disappearing Indian," the physical dispossession of African Americans through urban renewal, and gentrification. Mays also chronicles the wide-ranging forms of expression through which Black and Indigenous Detroiters have contested dispossession, such as the Red and Black Power movements and culturally relevant education. Through lively, accessible prose as well as historical and contemporary examples, City of Dispossessions will be of interest to readers of urban studies, Indigenous Studies, and critical ethnic studies.

More Than Kin

By Ty Johnston
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Ty Johnston
  • Isbn : 147012162X
  • Pages : 220
  • Category : Fiction
  • Reads : 293
  • File Pdf: more-than-kin.pdf

Book Summary:

Walt Johnson has been a rolling stone most of his life, moving from town to town and living on the edges of homelessness. Now he has run out of time as lung cancer has left him only months to live. Walt then begins a quest to find the son with whom he lost contact decades earlier. Out of money, he lands a job at a small-town restaurant in an attempt to save enough to buy a bus ticket to the last known whereabouts of his son. The friends Walt makes at his new job soon become family for him, especially 14-year-old Danny who is emotionally paralyzed at the loss of his own father in Iraq. Faced with Danny’s struggles to grow up and the struggles of his other new friends, Walt comes to realize he is not only on a journey to find his own son, but he is on a journey to find himself worthy of being a father.

Subordination or Empowerment?

By Richard A. Keiser
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Isbn : 9780195360493
  • Pages : 256
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 890
  • File Pdf: subordination-or-empowerment.pdf

Book Summary:

Why have Blacks won political empowerment in some cities and in others remained subordinated or had their achievements rolled back? Why do some cities have many Black leaders with multi-racial appeal while other cities have none? Subordination or Empowerment answers these questions through detailed historical examinations of the Black struggle for political power in Chicago, Gary, Philadelphia, and Atlanta. Keiser argues that electoral competition among White factions has created opportunities for Black leaders to win genuine political empowerment and avoid subordination. When electoral competition among Whites does not exist, Black votes lose their electoral leverage, leading to the rise of extra-electoral strategies. Keiser's dynamic theory of leadership formation explains the current appeal of Black separatism and messianism at the local and national levels and the consequent rise of leaders such as Louis Farakhan, and offers a rejoinder to Cornel West's critique of Black leadership in Race Matters.

Takeover

By Domingo Morel
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Oxford University Press
  • Isbn : 019067900X
  • Pages : 224
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 462
  • File Pdf: takeover.pdf

Book Summary:

State takeovers of local governments have garnered national attention of late, particularly following the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. In most U.S. cities, local governments are responsible for decisions concerning matters such as the local water supply and school affairs. However, once a state takes over, this decision-making capability is shuttled. Despite the widespread attention that takeovers in Flint and Detroit have gained, we know little about how such takeovers--a policy option that has been in use since the 1980s--affect political power in local communities. By focusing on takeovers of local school districts, this book offers the first systematic study of state takeovers of local governments. Although many major U.S. cities have experienced state takeovers of their local school districts, we know little about the political causes and consequences of takeovers. Complicating this phenomenon are the justifications for state takeokers; while they are assumedly based on concerns with poor academic performance, questions of race and political power play a critical role in the takeover of local school districts. However, Domingo Morel brings clarity to these questions and limitations--he examines the factors that contribute to state takeovers as well as the effects and political implications of takeovers on racialized communities, the communities most often affected by them. Morel both lays out the conditions under which the policy will disempower or empower racial and ethnic minority populations, and expands our understanding of urban politics. Morel argues that state interventions are a part of the new normal for cities and offers a novel theoretical framework for understanding the presence of the state in America's urban areas. The book is built around an original study of nearly 1000 school districts, including every school district that has been taken over by their respective state, and a powerful case study of Newark, New Jersey.

True Stories of Black South Carolina

By Damon L. Fordham
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Arcadia Publishing
  • Isbn : 1614234620
  • Pages : 168
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 390
  • File Pdf: true-stories-of-black-south-carolina.pdf

Book Summary:

From the Upstate to the Lowcountry, African Americans have had a gigantic impact on the Palmetto State. Unfortunately, their stories are often overshadowed. Collected here for the first time, this selection of essays by historian Damon L. Fordham brings these stories to light. Rediscover the tales of Samuel Smalls, the James Island beggar who inspired DuBose Heyward's Porgy, and Denmark Vesey, the architect of the great would-be slave rebellion of 1822. Learn about the blacks who lived and worked at what is now Mepkin Abbey, the Spartanburg woman who took part in a sit-in at the age of eleven and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s visit to Charleston in 1967. These articles are well-researched and provide an enlightening glimpse at the overlooked contributors to South Carolina's past.

Liquid City

By John R Short
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 1136527451
  • Pages : 200
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 441
  • File Pdf: liquid-city.pdf

Book Summary:

Megalopolis was the name given to a Peloponnesian city that was founded around 371- 368 BCE. Though planned on a grand scale, the city failed to realize the dreams of the founders, and it declined by the late Roman period. In 1957, the renowned geographer Jean Gottman applied the term in his description of the densely populated area of the northeastern United States that includes the cities of Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington. Liquid City is the first book to examine the social, economic, and demographic changes that have taken place in Megalopolis over the past fifty years. Nearly one in six Americans live in the modern Megalopolis, making it one of the largest city regions in the world. John Rennie Short juxtaposes Gottman's work with his own examination, providing a comprehensive assessment of the region's evolution. Particularly important are his use of 2000 Census data and his discussions of sources of identity, unity, and fragmentation in Megalopolis. Emphasizing the fluid, variable character of Megalopolis, this clear and accessible book focuses on five aspects of change: population redistribution from cities to suburbs; economic restructuring; immigration; patterns of racial/ethnic segregation; and the processes of globalization that have made one of the world's most influential economies.

From Sustainable to Resilient Cities

By William G. Holt
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Emerald Group Publishing
  • Isbn : 1784410578
  • Pages : 350
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 174
  • File Pdf: from-sustainable-to-resilient-cities.pdf

Book Summary:

This edited volume addresses sustainability efforts in cities and metropolitan regions around the world; focusing on four key areas: environment, economic, sociopolitical, and cultural sustainability. It includes chapters about applications to urban regions focusing on the movement from sustainable development to resilient urban centers.

The City in African-American Literature

By Yoshinobu Hakutani,Robert Butler
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
  • Isbn : 9780838635650
  • Pages : 265
  • Category : Literary Criticism
  • Reads : 547
  • File Pdf: the-city-in-african-american-literature.pdf

Book Summary:

While one of the central drives in classic American letters has been a reflexive desire to move away from the complexity and supposed corruption of cities toward such idealized nonurban settings as Cooper's prairies, Thoreau's woods, Melville's seas, Whitman's open road, and Twain's river, nearly the opposite has been true in African-American letters. Indeed the main tradition of African-American literature has been, for the most part, strikingly positive in its vision of the city. Although never hesitant to criticize the negative aspects of city life, classic African-American writers have only rarely suggested that pastoral alternatives exist for African-Americans and have therefore celebrated in a great variety of ways the possibilities of urban living. For Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Ralph Ellison, the city, despite its many problems, has been a place of deliverance and renewal. In the words of Alain Locke, the city provided "a new vision of opportunity" for African-Americans that could enable them to move from an enslaving "medieval" world to a modern world containing the possibility of liberation. More recent African-American literature has also been noteworthy for its largely affirmative vision of urban life. Amiri Baraka's 1981 essay "Black Literature and the Afro-American Nation: The Urban Voice" argues that, from the Harlem Renaissance onward, African-American literature has been "urban shaped," producing a uniquely "black urban consciousness." And Toni Morrison, although stressing that the American city in general has often induced a sense of alienation in many African-American writers, nevertheless adds that modern African-American literature is suffused with an "affection" for "the village within" the city. Gwendolyn Brook's poetry and Gloria Naylor's fiction, likewise, celebrate this sense of cultural unity in the black city. In addition to these writers, the sixteen new essays in this collection discuss the works of Claude McKay, William Attaway, Willard Motley, Ann Petry, John A. Williams, Charles Johnson, Samuel R. Delany, Ed Bullins, Adrienne Kennedy, and Lorraine Hansberry. The authors of these essays range from critics in America to those abroad, as well as from specialists in African-American literature to those in other fields.

Blacks and Social Change

By James W. Button
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Princeton University Press
  • Isbn : 1400860555
  • Pages : 344
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 950
  • File Pdf: blacks-and-social-change.pdf

Book Summary:

This book is a long-term empirical analysis of the impact of the civil rights movement on the real-life situations of southern blacks. Looking at the period from the late 1950s to the mid-1980s, it assesses the role of black political participation in six Florida cities. Originally published in 1989. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The New Black Sociologists

By Marcus A. Hunter
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Routledge
  • Isbn : 0429018053
  • Pages : 246
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 289
  • File Pdf: the-new-black-sociologists.pdf

Book Summary:

The New Black Sociologists follows in the footsteps of 1974’s pioneering text Black Sociologists: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives, by tracing the organization of its forbearer in key thematic ways. This new collection of essays revisit the legacies of significant Black scholars including James E. Blackwell, William Julius Wilson, Joyce Ladner, and Mary Pattillo, but also extends coverage to include overlooked figures like Audre Lorde, Ida B. Wells, James Baldwin and August Wilson - whose lives and work have inspired new generations of Black sociologists on contemporary issues of racial segregation, feminism, religiosity, class, inequality and urban studies.

Corners in the City of God

By Jonathan Tran,Myles Werntz
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Wipf and Stock Publishers
  • Isbn : 1608998517
  • Pages : 328
  • Category : Religion
  • Reads : 717
  • File Pdf: corners-in-the-city-of-god.pdf

Book Summary:

David Simon's The Wire lays out before us a city in which people struggle under the weight of poverty, political corruption, economic despair, educational collapse, and the drug trade. This volume explores the various theological, ethical, and philosophical challenges presented by The Wire. As each season of The Wire unfolds, the moral complexities of life in the city deepen, as the failures of one system have unforeseen effects in other corners of the city. Fleshing out the ongoing tension between the "earthly city" and the City of God, Corners in the City of God is a theological companion to David Simon's masterpiece, inviting the reader to wrestle with the implications of belonging fully to the cities of the world, in all of their splendor and tragedy.

African American Urban History since World War II

By Kenneth L. Kusmer,Joe W. Trotter
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press
  • Isbn : 0226465128
  • Pages : 552
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 148
  • File Pdf: african-american-urban-history-since-world-war-ii.pdf

Book Summary:

Historians have devoted surprisingly little attention to African American urban history ofthe postwar period, especially compared with earlier decades. Correcting this imbalance, African American Urban History since World War II features an exciting mix of seasoned scholars and fresh new voices whose combined efforts provide the first comprehensive assessment of this important subject. The first of this volume’s five groundbreaking sections focuses on black migration and Latino immigration, examining tensions and alliances that emerged between African Americans and other groups. Exploring the challenges of residential segregation and deindustrialization, later sections tackle such topics as the real estate industry’s discriminatory practices, the movement of middle-class blacks to the suburbs, and the influence of black urban activists on national employment and social welfare policies. Another group of contributors examines these themes through the lens of gender, chronicling deindustrialization’s disproportionate impact on women and women’s leading roles in movements for social change. Concluding with a set of essays on black culture and consumption, this volume fully realizes its goal of linking local transformations with the national and global processes that affect urban class and race relations.

Race, Reform, and Rebellion: The Second Reconstruction in Black America, 19451990, 3rd ed.

By
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Univ. Press of Mississippi
  • Isbn : 9781604736571
  • Pages :
  • Category :
  • Reads : 693
  • File Pdf: race-reform-and-rebellion.pdf

Book Summary:

Read and download full book Race, Reform, and Rebellion: The Second Reconstruction in Black America, 19451990, 3rd ed.

The Dream Is Lost

By Julian Maxwell Hayter
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University Press of Kentucky
  • Isbn : 0813169496
  • Pages : 360
  • Category : Political Science
  • Reads : 233
  • File Pdf: the-dream-is-lost.pdf

Book Summary:

Once the capital of the Confederacy and the industrial hub of slave-based tobacco production, Richmond, Virginia has been largely overlooked in the context of twentieth century urban and political history. By the early 1960s, the city served as an important center for integrated politics, as African Americans fought for fair representation and mobilized voters in order to overcome discriminatory policies. Richmond's African Americans struggled to serve their growing communities in the face of unyielding discrimination. Yet, due to their dedication to strengthening the Voting Rights Act of 1965, African American politicians held a city council majority by the late 1970s. In The Dream Is Lost, Julian Maxwell Hayter describes more than three decades of national and local racial politics in Richmond and illuminates the unintended consequences of civil rights legislation. He uses the city's experience to explain the political abuses that often accompany American electoral reforms and explores the arc of mid-twentieth-century urban history. In so doing, Hayter not only reexamines the civil rights movement's origins, but also seeks to explain the political, economic, and social implications of the freedom struggle following the major legislation of the 1960s. Hayter concludes his study in the 1980s and follows black voter mobilization to its rational conclusion -- black empowerment and governance. However, he also outlines how Richmond's black majority council struggled to the meet the challenges of economic forces beyond the realm of politics. The Dream Is Lost vividly illustrates the limits of political power, offering an important view of an underexplored aspect of the post--civil rights era.

The Rise of Chicago's Black Metropolis, 1920-1929

By Christopher Robert Reed
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : University of Illinois Press
  • Isbn : 0252093178
  • Pages : 304
  • Category : Social Science
  • Reads : 554
  • File Pdf: the-rise-of-chicago-s-black-metropolis-1920-1929.pdf

Book Summary:

During the Roaring '20s, African Americans rapidly transformed their Chicago into a "black metropolis." In this book, Christopher Robert Reed describes the rise of African Americans in Chicago's political economy, bringing to life the fleeting vibrancy of this dynamic period of racial consciousness and solidarity. Reed shows how African Americans rapidly transformed Chicago and achieved political and economic recognition by building on the massive population growth after the Great Migration from the South, the entry of a significant working class into the city's industrial work force, and the proliferation of black churches. Mapping out the labor issues and the struggle for control of black politics and black business, Reed offers an unromanticized view of the entrepreneurial efforts of black migrants, reassessing previous accounts such as St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton's 1945 study Black Metropolis. Utilizing a wide range of historical data, The Rise of Chicago's Black Metropolis, 1920–1929 delineates a web of dynamic social forces to shed light on black businesses and the establishment of a black professional class. The exquisitely researched volume draws on fictional and nonfictional accounts of the era, black community guides, mainstream and community newspapers, contemporary scholars and activists, and personal interviews.

The City in American Cinema

By Johan Andersson,Lawrence Webb
  • Format : Pdf, ePub, Mobi, Kindle
  • Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Isbn : 1350115630
  • Pages : 400
  • Category : Performing Arts
  • Reads : 834
  • File Pdf: the-city-in-american-cinema.pdf

Book Summary:

How has American cinema engaged with the rapid transformation of cities and urban culture since the 1960s? And what role have films and film industries played in shaping and mediating the “postindustrial” city? This collection argues that cinema and cities have become increasingly intertwined in the era of neoliberalism, urban branding, and accelerated gentrification. Examining a wide range of films from Hollywood blockbusters to indie cinema, it considers the complex, evolving relationship between moving image cultures and the spaces, policies, and politics of US cities from New York, Los Angeles, and Boston to Detroit, Oakland, and Baltimore. The contributors address questions of narrative, genre, and style alongside the urban contexts of production, exhibition, and reception, discussing films including The Friends of Eddie Coyle (1973), Cruising (1980), Desperately Seeking Susan (1985), King of New York (1990), Inception (2010), Frances Ha (2012), Fruitvale Station (2013), Only Lovers Left Alive (2013), and Doctor Strange (2016).